BAS member – achievement award

BAS Member's - Achievement Award

Congratulations to Dr Ken Wishaw for being recognised by the Queensland amateur astronomy community for research into human eye dark adaptation and the effects of red/amber light on adaptation speed and effectiveness. During 2018 Ken conduced research with volunteer astronomers at the Queensland Astrofest and Sunshine Coast BAS astronomy evenings, held at the Maleny Golf Club. His research found that the common red-wavelength light astronomers have been using for decades to protect night vision and speed dark adaptation, may not be the most efficient wavelength for in-door and at-the-scope lighting. Ken found that a more amber/orange wavelength may in fact be a better option.  Read more on the details of Ken’s research HERE.

Ken was recognised for this research at the 2019 Queensland Combined Astronomy Societies meeting held on December 6th at the University of Queensland. Well done Ken.

Ken also delivered an excellent talk at the meeting outlining the formation, objectives and recent achievements of the Australasian Dark Sky AllianceKen is one of the founding members of this initiative to help protect the night skies of Australia from the ravages of light pollution. Again, well done Ken.

Meritorious achievement award

Tony and Anne-Louise meritorious achievement award

The South-East Queensland Combined Astronomy Societies annual meeting was held on Friday December 6th at the University of Queensland. BAS is very proud to announce that two of our most hard working members – Tony and Anne-Louise Surma-Hawes – were recognised by the Queensland amateur astronomy community for their many years of commitment and effort invested into the planning, delivery and management of the annual Queensland Astrofest event. For many years, Tony and Anne-Louise have been the BAS representatives on the organising committee for this multi-society event. Tony and Anne-Louise put in countless hours each year, that BAS members never see, to make the Queensland Astrofest one of the most highly regarded astronomy festivals on the planet. So, a very big thank you to Tony and Anne-Louise.  May the Astofest-force continue to be with you for many more years to come.

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Gilmour Space Technologies speaks to BAS

Gilmour Space Technologies speaks to BAS

A very big thank you to Peter Kinne, head of sales for Gilmnour Space Technologies, for speaking at our October 2019 monthly meeting. It’s not often you get the chance to handle a chunk of rocket fuel – thank you Peter for bringing it along for show & tell. Now we all have a much better understanding of hybrid rocket technology and why this is likely to be Australia’s next pathway to space. BAS looks forward with huge anticipation to the next GST rocket launch.

2019 BAS Astro-Quiz

2019 BAS Astro-Quiz

At our July monthly meeting we held the annual BAS Astro Quiz for 2019. While surreptitious use of Google and Wikpedia were not endorsed at the meeting you are now free to give the quiz a try at home with every astro-resource available to you. No answers provided here, you will just have to do your own research. A PDF version of the quiz slides is available for download: Click Here

Laser Pointer Safety and BAS Policy

Laser Pointer Safety and BAS Policy

Brisbane Astronomical Society has a duty of care for public safety at its astronomical events. One potential area of risk to BAS Members, and the public, is the use of laser pointers either attached to a telescope or operated by hand. This Laser Pointer Safety Training Lecture material, and 23-point Laser Safety Policy, is designed to alert BAS members to potential dangers and risks associated with laser pointer use, and to guide BAS members in laser operational procedures that should help minimize the potential for adverse incident or personal injury. BAS members seeking to use a laser pointer at a BAS astronomical event are required to be certified that they have undertaken basic training in the safe operation of a laser pointer and understand some of the common risks associated with laser pointer use. The BAS Laser Pointer Safety Training materials, and 23-point Laser Safety Policy, and Certification application form, are available for PDF document download: Click Here

The Certification application form, alone, is available as a PDF document download: Click Here

August 2018 Meeting – Astronomy in Antarctica

August 2018 Meeting – Astronomy in Antarctica

Astronomy in Antarctica. It seems a strange place to locate a telescope. Most of us find a SE Queensland winter a sufficient challenge to operate a telescope. However, BAS member, Mike Zupanc, who has actually lived and worked in Antarctica, explained to us just why the frozen continent is one of the best places on Earth for a few specific forms of astronomy. For one, the atmospheric turbulence we experience in temperate and tropical zones from jet streams and moving high and low-pressure systems and pestering clouds, are not an issue on the high dome regions of central Antarctica. Moisture is also never a problem as it instantly freezes to ice on the ice pack. So, telescopes are free of dust and condensation and can even track circumpolar objects continuously at certain times of the year. We even learned that the University of NSW has an entirely autonomous telescope operating in Antarctica. That is an impressive feat. Most of us have enough trouble keeping our telescopes operating for a few hours within arm’s reach.

Thank you Mike for a really informative talk.

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